204-208: Movies on an airplane

Watching movies on an airplane is never the most beneficial way. The screen is way too small and the movie itself is cropped, if not downright censored by the airline. But it does give you the opportunity to watch those movies that you never were intending to watch anyway. Recently I found myself on a round trip to Europe (a ten-hour flight), so I had some catching up to do. I ended up watching five movies all the way through and one, Madagascar 3, which I will finish at a later opportunity, because that movie was just bat shit crazy. The five movies I watched were:

204: Rock of Ages

rock-of-agesHoly smokes, this was a mixed bag of good and bad feelings. I love ‘80s music, I love a good musical now and then and I generally like it when Tom Cruise goes balls to the wall. But Rock of Ages was just too much for me. Some of the songs I could get through, because to be honest some of the originals just deserve to be butchered, youth sentiment or not. Other songs were just too horrendous for words. For example, Malin Akerman and Cruise trying to create some sort of horrible version of Foreigner’s I Want to Know What Love Is (one of my favorite songs ever) made me jump to the screen to find the fast forward button. It was that horrendous. Besides the mostly not-so-good renditions of the songs the screenplay in itself had nothing new to bring to the table and started to irritate me after a while. In the end Rock of Ages just felt like an experiment gone wrong.

205: The Sweeney

the-sweeneyThe British are a rough bunch and The Sweeney proves that you don’t want to get on the wrong side of the law over there. Ray Winstone plays Regan, a hard-nosed cop who leads a team of officers who have their own particular brand of law enforcement. They don’t shy away from methods that are by many deemed less than desirable, but they get the job done and for some that is the only thing that counts. Regan comes under fire from Internal Affairs exactly because of his methods and to complicate his situation even further he is having an affair with the investigator from IA and an old adversary suddenly decides to return to the scene. With a pulse-pounding soundtrack, moody photography and excellent acting The Sweeney proves it is a force to be reckoned with. The Sweeney combines the style of Michael Mann, the bombast of Christopher Nolan and the mindless action of Michael Bay to create a whole that is thoroughly entertaining.

206: Men in Black 3

men-in-black-3I was never a big fan of Men in Black. I found it to be really on the nose and most of the time not that funny. I was, however, impressed by the chemistry between Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones. In Men in Black 2 some of that chemistry was there, but it was overshadowed by an extremely bad screenplay that wasn’t able to reproduce any of the good stuff from the first movie. Now, several years later, we get a third installment, and I must say that the the people behind the scenes have redeemed themselves. This is a very funny and even in some way emotional return to the characters we liked so much in part one. Especially Josh Brolin as a younger version of Tommy Lee Jones is a home run. The movie has enough momentum to move along at a brisk pace with an ending that took me completely by surprise. I did not see that twist coming, but maybe that was a stuffy atmosphere in the airplane playing tricks on me.

207: The Bourne Legacy

the-bourne-legacyI like the original Bourne Trilogy very much. Matt Damon managed to create a character that was on one hand a terminator and on the other a human being searching for his identity. All the machinations around him made these movies even more compelling, but it was really Damon who sold them. With The Bourne Ultimatum Paul Greengrass finished the trilogy in a very satisfying manner, so why would we need a fourth Bourne movie? Beats me, and The Bourne Legacy didn’t make me a believer either. We are led to believe that there are more people like Bourne out there, which is not really a stretch, and that they are controlled by a Jurassic Park-like scheme revolving around mysterious chems without which the agents can’t really perform. Legacy starts out decent with Jeremy Renner proving he is certainly up to the task to perform the physical part of the role, but director Tony Gilroy (writer of the original trilogy) can’t keep up the pace and he gets bogged down in a run-of-the-mill story that in no way can hold a candle to the Damon-Bourne movies. For the most part I was pretty much bored to tears by The Bourne Legacy.

208: The Watch

the-watchWhen The Watch was released in theaters I had the feeling I had already seen the best parts of the movie by seeing the trailer several times. And I wasn’t far off, because that was almost entirely true. Ben Stiller, Vince Vaughn, Jonah Hill and relative newcomer Richard Ayoade are all members of the neighborhood watch, while they don’t really share the same intentions for this extracurricular activity. As it so happens an alien invasion is about to go down in their neighborhood and they seem to be the last line of defense for the human race. The one thing that is great about The Watch is director Akiva Schaffer’s willingness to let his cast go off the rails most of the time. I got the feeling that a lot of what is shown in The Watch was actually improvised by the comedians during shooting. The most hilarious moments come when Vaughn and Hill are let loose, these guys are improve masters and it shows. If only the rest of the movie was as good as those moments. The Watch is long, largely not very funny and ultimately unsatisfying. Given the cast and crew involved this could have been a slam dunk, now… not so much.

185: Hope Springs

hope-springs

Marriage is hard. I can tell you this from experience. It is a delicate game of give and take that can be screwed up far too easily. Kay (Meryl Streep) knows this all too well. She has been married for over three decades, but over the years anything resembling passion has been replaced by routine and more importantly… distance. Her husband, Arnold (Tommy Lee Jones), doesn’t see the problem. He gets his breakfast every morning, is home for dinner and falls asleep in front of the television. Kay and Arnold have become roommates instead of a married couple and Kay wants some of their old life back. She arranges an intense therapy session and tells Arnold she is going, whether he wants to come or not. Along the course of the therapy sessions, led by Dr. Feld (a surprisingly restrained Steve Carell), secrets are revealed and problems are laid bare.

What Hope Springs wants to tell us is that when we want a marriage to work there has to be passion and communication. Without those two elements there is no use in staying married. Even more important is the message that forcing these two elements is often even worse. Both Kay and Arnold try to force their love for each other in extreme ways and both times they fail. They (and we) come to the conclusion that love is organic and inexplicable and that it can’t be coerced by way of some strawberries or candles. It probably helps a little, but if the foundation isn’t there, forget about it.

Hope Springs is surprisingly candid about all these revelations and this is mostly due to the brilliant performances of the central cast. I connected a lot with Jones, mostly because I recognize some of myself in him (and vowed to change some of those traits after seeing the film). Streep channels her age perfectly and shows us a vulnerable side that is heartbreaking. Carell rounds out the trio with a performance we have not seen often from him. He never loses his cool and moderates the conversation between Kay and Arnold instead of dictating it with his usual shenanigans.

I had already heard through the grapevine that Hope Springs was a lot better than the poster or trailer made it out to be. This is true, but there are certainly problems with Hope Springs. Director David Frankel’s (The Devil Wears Prada) incessant use of songs is so overtly manipulative that it becomes almost expected that we get Annie Lennox’s Why? blaring from the speakers when our heroes need to work out something crucial in their relationship. Luckily the performances overcome Frankel’s constant search for melodrama by not giving in to his wishes. Streep and Jones play their parts so down to earth that no amount of musical melodrama could tear them down. Maybe that’s why Hope Springs works so well.